From 65 Things you can recycle right now 

Books are a weakness of mine. I find it hard to part with them once I’ve read them. They just look so pretty on the bookcase! But they take up space, and if you want to buy new books, you have to part with the old ones.

Books are quite straightforward to sell. If you’ve got textbooks Amazon and eBay are a great place to start, textbooks tend to be quite expensive and some editions will sell for a lot of money. Novels are harder to sell because they are mass produced, so you likely won’t make that much money selling them. If you decide to sell novels, you may make more money selling books as a collection than selling as singles.

If you don’t fancy navigating the wilds of auction selling, there are plenty of companies that will take books off your hands in bulk. Most of these options give you a way to check how much you’ll make before selling, make sure to pay attention as you may only be offered a few pence for each of your books. There are lots of links to selling sites at the end of this article for you to explore.

If you don’t want to sell you can donate books to a school, library or charity shop. It’s always a good idea to check with the shop before donating. Book swapping is a great way to exchange old books for new books. All you need to do is make friends with other readers and agree to swap books when you are done. I used to do this with about three friends and once a book had done the rounds we donated it to a charity shop.

You could also set up a book swap in your school, office, church or any other group you belong to. Simply put books you don’t want on a bookshelf and let others take them for free. Books contain many adventures, but what if your book went on an adventure of its own?

Similar to the book swapping option, Book Crossing encourages you to send your books out into the wild, only you’ll be able to track where they’ve been via a number of journal entries left by whoever is reading them at the time.

 

Source: 65 Things you can recycle right now – Vintage Cash Cowriosities

Two “New” Books!

Two new books showed up in the Little Free Library bearing BookCrossing Labels last night.  I registered them and released them back into the wild.

If you find them, please take a moment to log them into BookCrossing so folks can see where they travel.

 

Screenshot 2016-03-14 07.47.09

 

Several years ago, my mom found a book with a curious label in it.  The label said it was a “BookCrossing” book.  My mom doesn’t have a computer, so I registered the book and I was off and running. I think this idea is so cool.

Each book has a unique BCID (BookCrossing ID).  By entering that number at http://www.bookcrossing.com/ you can see where the book has been – and then you can track where it goes.  If you’re familiar with Where’s George? for dollar bills, this is similar.

Many other Little Free Libraries are connected with BookCrossing and I thought it would be fun to have my Greenbriar Little Free Library #33664 play along, too.

In addition to randomly finding books, you can also go hunting for them at http://www.bookcrossing.com/hunt

This video is a great short explanation:

The Greenbriar Little Free Library #33664 is an official BookCrossing Zone.

Today is National Read A Book Day!

Shouldn’t every day be Read a Book Day?

In another of the “Who Knew” Holidays…

national-read-books

 

National Read A Book Day is observed annually on September 6th.

Don’t keep it to yourself.  Share the experience!  Read aloud to anyone who will listen.

How-to_Read-A-Book

Reading improves memory and concentration as well as reduces stress.   Older adults who spend time reading show a slower cognitive decline and tend to participate in more mentally stimulating activities over their lifetime.  Books are an inexpensive entertainment, education and time machine, too!

 

8 changes that were made to a classic Richard Scarry book to keep up with the times. Progress!

 

Richard Scarry was an incredibly prolific children’s author and illustrator. He created over 250 books during his career. His books were loved across the world — over 100 million were sold in many languages.But here’s something you may not have known about these classics: They’ve been slowly changing over the years.Don’t panic! They’ve been changing in a good way.Scarry started publishing books in the 1950s, when times were, well, a little different. So some of the details were quietly updated.Alan Taylor, a senior editor for the photo section of The Atlantic, noticed differences back in 2005 and decided to photograph them.

Source: 8 changes that were made to a classic Richard Scarry book to keep up with the times. Progress!

International Book Giving Day

book-giving-day-infographic

 

Some of you may know that I’m getting involved in Little Free Library (LFL) and there is a year-old library on my street under the auspices of the O’Connor Music Studio.

When our son is home for a visit, we always go out on a hiking trail with the dog, Mimi, and sometimes my mom.  On one occasion, we say a LFL in the middle of a trail and thought someone made it themselves.

Then there was another one…

DS knew I was fascinated by this whole idea and ordered one for me last Christmas.

I have found one other in our neighborhood, outside the swimming pool.

Watch for more information about our LFL.

 

In the meantime, don’t forget to celebrate International Book Giving Day tomorrow.

 

From http://bookgivingday.com/

You’ve heard about International Book Giving Day. You love the idea. You’ve got some great quality books. What next?

This fabulous infographic (above) has been created by Jo Ebisujima – Jojoebi, one of the IBGD team, to help you solve that very quandary.

Share your plans on social media using #bookgivingday

Unwanted Books?

unwanted-books

 

Personally, I can’t imagine unwanted books but if you got something that’s not to your reading taste, why not “trade it in” at a Little Free Library near you?

There are lots of them around, including 4 in my own neighborhood.

And we have all these withing a 10-mile radius:

screenshot-2017-01-02-10-25-29

Find out what’s near you here.

Our library is always open to trade, browse, borrow or donate.

Greenbriar Little Free Library #33664
https://www.facebook.com/GreenbriarLittleFreeLibrary/

Picture Books to Teach Empathy and Compassion

 

This is a book list of picture books to teach empathy. A reader emailed the author and asked for a list of books which would help her child to think a little bit less about worldly goods, and a little more about the importance of appreciating non-tangible values like generosity, humility, compassion and kindness. In other words, these are books which help teach children to reject a sense of privileged entitlement.

Read the article here: Picture Books to Teach Empathy and Compassion