Can you Steal a Free Book?

lfl

From Book Riot

Little Free Libraries are pure literary generosity.

These charming book exchanges, which stand in front yards across the country (and around the world), are typically self-sustaining. Neighbors take a book when they see something they like, and donate a book when they have one to share.

Through this cyclical system, Little Free Libraries are kept full, with inventory that constantly changes.

But, recently, there have been reports of ne’er-do-wells who don’t get the honor-system concept. Instead of choosing one book, or dropping off a title or two, these killjoys take all the books — every last one — leaving nothing but empty shelves for the next patron to find.

Read more at http://bookriot.com/2015/08/04/can-rob-little-free-library/

Luckily, nothing like this has happened to our LFL,  Greenbriar Little Free Library #33664 (https://www.facebook.com/GreenbriarLittleFreeLibrary/), although I read stories about theft and vandalism on a Facebook page for LFL stewards.

What do you think?  Is it possible to steal something that is free?

Who Knew?

Today is National Biographer’s Day!

stack-of-books

National Biographer’s Day commemorates the anniversary of the first meeting of Samuel Johnson and his biographer James Boswell in London, England on May 16, 1763, and honors all biographers.

A biography is a written account of another person’s life.

Famous poet, essayist, literary critic, editor and lexicographer, Johnson was also a biographer. According to Johnson, the best biographers were those who ate, drank and “lived in social intercourse” with those about whom they wrote. If that were true, his best biography would be An Account of the Life of Mr. Richard Savage, Son of the earl Rivers which was published in 1744.

Applying this same rule, Scots-born James Boswell met his friend Samuel Johnson at a bookshop near Covent Garden. Nearly 30 years later he published The Life of Johnson, which became the most celebrated English biography.

 

 

From one of my favorite shows, Blackadder.  Dr. Samuel Johnson seeks the regent’s support for his dictionary, but when it is used for firewood, Edmund must rewrite it.

 

World Book Day

 

World Book Day or World Book and Copyright Day (also known as International Day of the Book or World Book Days) is a yearly event on April 23rd, organized by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), to promote reading, publishing and copyright.

In the United Kingdom, the day is recognized on the first Thursday in March. World Book Day was celebrated for the first time on 23 April 1995.

 

 

National Bookmobile Day

 

Bookmobile Day is an opportunity to celebrate one of the many services offered through public libraries. Originating in the nineteenth century, the earliest bookmobiles were horse-drawn wagons filled with boxes of books.

In the 1920s, Sarah Byrd Askew, a New Jersey librarian, thought reading and literacy so important that she delivered books to rural readers in her own Ford Model T. And today, Kenya still uses camels to deliver materials to fans of reading in rural areas.

 

Fairfax County Bookmobile Timeline:

1890s – Bookmobile serves northwestern part of Fairfax County.

1938 – Fairfax County Chamber of Commerce proposes a consolidation of library services to the Fairfax County Board of Supervisors in order to include both urban and rural areas of the County. Branches are to be established in heavily populated areas and bookmobile service to all other residents. The Chamber appoints a library committee.

1940 – First County-wide bookmobile in a truck loaned by the W.P.A.

1942 – W.P.A. support for the bookmobile ends December 31.

1943 – County purchases a vehicle for bookmobile.

1947 – County purchases a new bookmobile, a customized school bus.

 

 

Bryant Park Little Free Library

 

This last weekend we were in Bryant Park in NYC for the Tartan Day Parade.  We got there a little early (intentionally) to hear a pipe and drum concert.  When it was over, we wandered a bit around Bryant Park and came across this Reading Room.

We knew that Bryant Park was actually built over the New York City Public Library stacks so this was especially cool.

Bryant Park is located entirely over an underground structure that houses the library’s stacks, which were built in the 1980s when the park was closed to the public and excavated; the new library facilities were built below ground level while the park was restored above it.

In addition to the LFL part, they had books to be read there only, a newspaper section, a magazine section, a section of Oxford Classics, a children’s section… just like a “real library”.

What a great way to spend some time waiting for the parade to start!

 

 

Four million books are stored underneath Bryant Park. Twenty-seven feet below the grassy patch in mid-town Manhattan are miles and miles of bookshelves at the New York Public Library’s (NYPL) Milstein Research Stacks.  Here’s how they get books from those stacks under Bryant Park to the main library.

The New York Public Library announced they have completed its conveyor system for requested media. The $2.6 million system uses 24 carts to truck books through the library’s 11 levels to the Rose Reading Room. Here’s how it works, and what it’s like to ride inside one.