The Greenbriar LFL is 2 Today!

 

March 26, 2016: The paint has dried, so now to add the books today 🙂

 

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Here’s us, at the top of the list:  Find a Little Free Library near you at http://locator.njntrubl.com/

others

 

Greenbriar Little Free Library #33664 is on Facebook at   https://www.facebook.com/GreenbriarLittleFreeLibrary/

Happy Birthday, Dr. Seuss!

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We’re having a huge wind advisory today, with lots of nearby power outages, so we can’t have a Dr. Seuss party  in the Little Free Library this year.

Meanwhile, though…

 

 

Theodor Seuss Geisel (Dr. Seuss) was born in Springfield, Massachusetts, where I also grew up and went to High School.

The Springfield Library Quadrangle has been home to the Dr. Seuss National Memorial Sculpture Garden since 2002.

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Today is National Read A Book Day!

Shouldn’t every day be Read a Book Day?

In another of the “Who Knew” Holidays…

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National Read A Book Day is observed annually on September 6th.

Don’t keep it to yourself.  Share the experience!  Read aloud to anyone who will listen.

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Reading improves memory and concentration as well as reduces stress.   Older adults who spend time reading show a slower cognitive decline and tend to participate in more mentally stimulating activities over their lifetime.  Books are an inexpensive entertainment, education and time machine, too!

 

Piano Puzzlers!

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The Piano Puzzlers book is available in the O’Connor Music Studio library if you’d like to give any a try.  Knock on the front door or the house behind the LFL to ask.

Piano Puzzlers as heard on American Public Media’s “Performance Today.” Includes 32 tunes with songs by Gershwin, Berlin, Arlen, Porter, Rodgers, Fats Waller, Lennon & McCartney, and others disguised in the styles of Bach, Handel, Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, Brahms, Schubert, Schumann, Chopin, Janacek, Debussy, Ravel, Rachmaninoff, Stravinsky, Prokofiev, Bartok, and Copland.

Includes an introduction by Fred Child, host of “Performance Today” as well as background info by Bruce Adolphe. “Bruce Adolphe has taken a common musician’s party game and elevated it to high art and truly funny musical slapsticks. The Piano Puzzlers are a unique combination of extraordinary insight into the styles of many composers subtle, expert workmanship and great, great fun!”

From http://jasonmorris.blogsome.com/2008/08/08/piano-puzzlers/

If you’re a music geek (like me), I have a program for you. Now, let me be clear, to fully qualify as a music geek…you must have a fond appreciation for classical music (no, Poison, Quiet Riot, and Zepplin do not count as classical music). So, if you’re a “music geek” without an appreciation for classical music…well, I hate to burst your bubble…but, you’re not truly a music geek. Instead, you’re a music appreciator, but not a geek. So, if you just listen to indie music and scowl at anything on a label larger than Matador…don’t bother following the link I’ll provide…the fun will be lost on you…And, you probably won’t have a chance.

Every Wednesday night, on my way home from WNL, I turn on my local NPR station to listen to Piano Puzzlers on Performance Today. It’s absolutely incredible. A pianist/composer (Bruce Adolphe) takes a familiar folk or pop tune and sets it inside a classical masterpiece (or in the style of a particular composer). Sometimes it’s easy…sometimes it’s ridiculously difficult. There are days when I say, “got it” on the first pass. Then there are days when I say, “what the heck?” And, more often than not, I’m able to get either the popular/folk tune or the composer.

This is sad to admit, but there are nights when I’ll slow down on the drive home or sit in the car in the driveway to finish an episode. In fact, I get a little worked up if someone stops me after WNL…as I might miss the beginning of Piano Puzzlers (it usually hits around 8:20pm on our local station).

Take a listen to some of the archives and see if you can figure it out! It’s really cool…but probably only appreciated by music geeks (the kind of people that listen to NPR for their musical programs and not just the snipets of cool indie rock between segments on All Things Considered…which is a great show too).

Play Piano Puzzlers HERE!

Can you Steal a Free Book?

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From Book Riot

Little Free Libraries are pure literary generosity.

These charming book exchanges, which stand in front yards across the country (and around the world), are typically self-sustaining. Neighbors take a book when they see something they like, and donate a book when they have one to share.

Through this cyclical system, Little Free Libraries are kept full, with inventory that constantly changes.

But, recently, there have been reports of ne’er-do-wells who don’t get the honor-system concept. Instead of choosing one book, or dropping off a title or two, these killjoys take all the books — every last one — leaving nothing but empty shelves for the next patron to find.

Read more at http://bookriot.com/2015/08/04/can-rob-little-free-library/

Luckily, nothing like this has happened to our LFL,  Greenbriar Little Free Library #33664 (https://www.facebook.com/GreenbriarLittleFreeLibrary/), although I read stories about theft and vandalism on a Facebook page for LFL stewards.

What do you think?  Is it possible to steal something that is free?

Bryant Park Little Free Library

 

This last weekend we were in Bryant Park in NYC for the Tartan Day Parade.  We got there a little early (intentionally) to hear a pipe and drum concert.  When it was over, we wandered a bit around Bryant Park and came across this Reading Room.

We knew that Bryant Park was actually built over the New York City Public Library stacks so this was especially cool.

Bryant Park is located entirely over an underground structure that houses the library’s stacks, which were built in the 1980s when the park was closed to the public and excavated; the new library facilities were built below ground level while the park was restored above it.

In addition to the LFL part, they had books to be read there only, a newspaper section, a magazine section, a section of Oxford Classics, a children’s section… just like a “real library”.

What a great way to spend some time waiting for the parade to start!

 

 

Four million books are stored underneath Bryant Park. Twenty-seven feet below the grassy patch in mid-town Manhattan are miles and miles of bookshelves at the New York Public Library’s (NYPL) Milstein Research Stacks.  Here’s how they get books from those stacks under Bryant Park to the main library.

The New York Public Library announced they have completed its conveyor system for requested media. The $2.6 million system uses 24 carts to truck books through the library’s 11 levels to the Rose Reading Room. Here’s how it works, and what it’s like to ride inside one.

 

Unwanted Books?

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Personally, I can’t imagine unwanted books but if you got something that’s not to your reading taste, why not “trade it in” at a Little Free Library near you?

There are lots of them around, including 4 in my own neighborhood.

And we have all these withing a 10-mile radius:

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Find out what’s near you here.

Our library is always open to trade, browse, borrow or donate.

Greenbriar Little Free Library #33664
https://www.facebook.com/GreenbriarLittleFreeLibrary/