Greenbriar Flyer, April 2016

Screenshot 2016-04-07 09.50.35

Screenshot 2016-04-07 09.51.15

Hooray!  I’m not sure if we’re getting any more readers from this but we’re definitely getting more book donations.

Right now, we’re getting an average of 5 new books donated each day – faster than I can keep up with stamping and adding BookCrossing bookplates.

I have started reading up on starting a Geocache nearby, as well.  Want to know more?

It’s all good!

smiley-read

Picture Books to Teach Empathy and Compassion

 

This is a book list of picture books to teach empathy. A reader emailed the author and asked for a list of books which would help her child to think a little bit less about worldly goods, and a little more about the importance of appreciating non-tangible values like generosity, humility, compassion and kindness. In other words, these are books which help teach children to reject a sense of privileged entitlement.

Read the article here: Picture Books to Teach Empathy and Compassion

Have an E-Reader?

You can now download over 300,000 books from the NYPL for free.

There’s good news for all the e-bookworms out there. The New York Public Library released an app today that allows anyone with a library card (and an iOS or Android phone).

It’s called SimplyE and will allow you to read books on your phone, but beware, there might be a wait list for some popular titles, including the Game of Thrones series. (Check out the Harry Potter books, quick!)

The online collection will continue to grow, and there are Kindle and web browser versions in development. But, for now, take a break from Pokemon Go and read to your digital heart’s content.

Source: You can now download over 300,000 books from the NYPL for free

Two Editions Of The Same Book Demonstrate How Our Society Has Changed In 30 Years

This was one of my son’s favorite books as a child.

scarry

When Alan Taylor, senior editor at The Atlantic was reading to his kids, he noticed something unusual.He was reading The Best Word Book Ever by renowned children’s author Richard Scarry, whose animal-populated worlds have charmed generations of children.

In fact, Alan had a copy of the book himself as a child.But as he was reading it, he noticed some changes. He immediately compared his kids’ copy — published in 1991 — with the copy he remembered — published in 1963.

It turns out that Richard Scarry, who has authored more than 300 books for kids since 1949, has also been updating his works from time to time.

Read the rest of the article at: Two Editions Of The Same Book Demonstrate How Our Society Has Changed In 30 Years

Little by Little, One for the Books

newspaper-library

 

Scarborough (Maine) Public Library has been offering a central place for residents to get books of all genres for more than 100 years. Now, there is a push to get literature into residents’ hands in a much different way.

This spring, the library will launch two Little Free Libraries, small privately operated libraries in which people can take or leave a book as they see fit: one at Memorial Park and one at the trail head of the Eastern Trail.

The first Little Free Library was started by Todd Bol in Hudson, Wisconsin, in 2009. The goal was to inspire the creation of at least 2,510 Little Free Libraries, the amount of libraries Andrew Carnegie helped to start. That was achieved in August 2012. As of January 2016, there were more than 36,000 Little Free Libraries in all 50 states and 70 countries. Approximately 9.3 million books are exchanged each year via Little Free Libraries.

Former preschool director Connie Weed opened this Little Free Library outside her Asselyn Drive home as a way to share the books she has accumulated over the years. There are few limitations on what books can be offered or rules regarding how Little Free Libraries can be run. The Little Free Library organization strives to “promote literacy and the love of reading by building free book exchanges worldwide and to build a sense of community as we share skills, creativity and wisdom across generations.”

The idea is simple: Like municipal libraries, the Little Free Libraries offer the public an opportunity take a book free of charge. Those who take a book are encouraged to leave a book in return the next time they visit, although it doesn’t have to be the one they borrowed.

 

Read the entire article at http://sentry.mainelymediallc.com/news/2016-03-11/Community/Little_by_little_one_for_the_books.html