Grammar Day

grammar-day

 

National Grammar Day is observed across the United States each year on March 4th.

According to Global Language Monitor, the estimated number of words in the English language is 1,025,109.  There is some controversy to that number, but it’s safe to say it is over a million.

Language is something to celebrate.  Some people might suggest that grammar is a set of rules for language, but really it is a system for understanding a language; how the words are structured.   Understanding the system and the structure helps us to better understand the language, and can help us to learn new languages.

There are some hard and fast rules in grammar, though.  Even some of those come up for debate from time to time.  Have you ever heard of the Oxford comma?

 

HOW TO OBSERVE

Do your best to use proper grammar and use #NationalGrammarDay to post on social media.

 

HISTORY

Martha Brockenbrough, founder of the Society for the Promotion of Good Grammar, designated National Grammar Day in 2008.

As the National Grammar Day website states, “Language is something to be celebrated, and March 4 is the perfect day to do it. It’s not only a date, it’s an imperative: March forth on March 4 to speak well, write well, and help others do the same!”

For more information and ideas on ways to celebrate National Grammar Day, visit the website at: http://nationalgrammarday.com/

 

Doesn’t this sound neat?

At The Open Book, in Wigtown, Scotland, you can fulfill your dream of running a bookstore. The unique Airbnb flat costs just 57 USD a night, but it comes with a stipulation: renters also work at the bookshop on the first floor, doing everything that a regular bookshop owner might do in a regular, 40-hour work-week.

Source: Travellers Staying At This Place In Scotland Take Turns Running The Bookshop Downstairs | Bored Panda

Happy Birthday, Dr. Seuss!

drSeussBirthdayGreeting

 

We’re having a huge wind advisory today, with lots of nearby power outages, so we can’t have a Dr. Seuss party  in the Little Free Library this year.

Meanwhile, though…

 

 

Theodor Seuss Geisel (Dr. Seuss) was born in Springfield, Massachusetts, where I also grew up and went to High School.

The Springfield Library Quadrangle has been home to the Dr. Seuss National Memorial Sculpture Garden since 2002.

seuss-memorial2 seuss-memorial

 

 

 

 

Mystery Author Extravaganza! Saturday at 1 PM – 3 PM

 

It’s a Mystery Author Extravaganza! On Saturday, December 2nd, eighteen authors from the Sisters in Crime Chessie Chapter will appear at the Reston, Virginia, library, speaking about their new books and short stories published this year. If you live in Northern Virginia, DC, or the nearby Maryland burbs, this event is for you.

The following authors will be appearing: Donna Andrews, E.A. Aymar, Karen Cantwell, Mary Ann Corrigan (Maya Corrigan), Barb Goffman, Sherry Harris, Tara Laskowski, Alan Orloff, Kathryn O’Sullivan, Susan Reiss, KM Rockwood, Verena Rose, Harriette Sackler, Laura Ellen Scott, Colleen Shogan, Shawn Reilly Simmons, Art Taylor, and Robin Templeton.

Booksellers from Kathy Harig’s Mystery Loves Company bookshop will be on hand to sell books. The authors will be happy to sign them. It will be a great way to take care of your holiday book shopping. Books make great gifts for yourself and others. Book sales begin around 12:30. Speakers start at 1 p.m. We hope to see you there!

 

Reston Regional Library, 11925 Bowman Towne Dr, Reston, VA 20190

Today is National Read A Book Day!

Shouldn’t every day be Read a Book Day?

In another of the “Who Knew” Holidays…

national-read-books

 

National Read A Book Day is observed annually on September 6th.

Don’t keep it to yourself.  Share the experience!  Read aloud to anyone who will listen.

How-to_Read-A-Book

Reading improves memory and concentration as well as reduces stress.   Older adults who spend time reading show a slower cognitive decline and tend to participate in more mentally stimulating activities over their lifetime.  Books are an inexpensive entertainment, education and time machine, too!

 

Piano Puzzlers!

puzzlers

 

The Piano Puzzlers book is available in the O’Connor Music Studio library if you’d like to give any a try.  Knock on the front door or the house behind the LFL to ask.

Piano Puzzlers as heard on American Public Media’s “Performance Today.” Includes 32 tunes with songs by Gershwin, Berlin, Arlen, Porter, Rodgers, Fats Waller, Lennon & McCartney, and others disguised in the styles of Bach, Handel, Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, Brahms, Schubert, Schumann, Chopin, Janacek, Debussy, Ravel, Rachmaninoff, Stravinsky, Prokofiev, Bartok, and Copland.

Includes an introduction by Fred Child, host of “Performance Today” as well as background info by Bruce Adolphe. “Bruce Adolphe has taken a common musician’s party game and elevated it to high art and truly funny musical slapsticks. The Piano Puzzlers are a unique combination of extraordinary insight into the styles of many composers subtle, expert workmanship and great, great fun!”

From http://jasonmorris.blogsome.com/2008/08/08/piano-puzzlers/

If you’re a music geek (like me), I have a program for you. Now, let me be clear, to fully qualify as a music geek…you must have a fond appreciation for classical music (no, Poison, Quiet Riot, and Zepplin do not count as classical music). So, if you’re a “music geek” without an appreciation for classical music…well, I hate to burst your bubble…but, you’re not truly a music geek. Instead, you’re a music appreciator, but not a geek. So, if you just listen to indie music and scowl at anything on a label larger than Matador…don’t bother following the link I’ll provide…the fun will be lost on you…And, you probably won’t have a chance.

Every Wednesday night, on my way home from WNL, I turn on my local NPR station to listen to Piano Puzzlers on Performance Today. It’s absolutely incredible. A pianist/composer (Bruce Adolphe) takes a familiar folk or pop tune and sets it inside a classical masterpiece (or in the style of a particular composer). Sometimes it’s easy…sometimes it’s ridiculously difficult. There are days when I say, “got it” on the first pass. Then there are days when I say, “what the heck?” And, more often than not, I’m able to get either the popular/folk tune or the composer.

This is sad to admit, but there are nights when I’ll slow down on the drive home or sit in the car in the driveway to finish an episode. In fact, I get a little worked up if someone stops me after WNL…as I might miss the beginning of Piano Puzzlers (it usually hits around 8:20pm on our local station).

Take a listen to some of the archives and see if you can figure it out! It’s really cool…but probably only appreciated by music geeks (the kind of people that listen to NPR for their musical programs and not just the snipets of cool indie rock between segments on All Things Considered…which is a great show too).

Play Piano Puzzlers HERE!

8 changes that were made to a classic Richard Scarry book to keep up with the times. Progress!

 

Richard Scarry was an incredibly prolific children’s author and illustrator. He created over 250 books during his career. His books were loved across the world — over 100 million were sold in many languages.But here’s something you may not have known about these classics: They’ve been slowly changing over the years.Don’t panic! They’ve been changing in a good way.Scarry started publishing books in the 1950s, when times were, well, a little different. So some of the details were quietly updated.Alan Taylor, a senior editor for the photo section of The Atlantic, noticed differences back in 2005 and decided to photograph them.

Source: 8 changes that were made to a classic Richard Scarry book to keep up with the times. Progress!